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1 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American December 1930 Volume 143 Number 6
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1930 First Edition Paperback Good Magazine 4to - over 9" - 12" tall 
Features: photo of interesting "new ears" for anti-aircraft gunners; a 4000 year food experiment - nutritional equilibrium in over-populated China; Editorials - spend for prosperity - Daniel Guggenheim - International affairs; Instrument flying to combat fog; Elevated highway to speed traffic in New York; X-ray fingers feel out the atomic structure of matter; A fact-finding laboratory; Archeology enters the stamp world; What is a quantum?; Feeding the crew of a battleship; More about pluto - further observations confirm its right to rank as a planet; Oil from below the ocean floor - oil derrick and pier are constructed in perilous waters; Factory wastes turned to profits; Scattered light and the Raman effect; An atom of Lutecium - its atomic structure is plotted for the first time; A murder, and the story the pistols told; When crude oil crosses the seas; Traveling home for phone linemen - a railroad train refitted as living, eating ,recreation quarters; Aviation in 1930, a summary. Back cover features colour advertisement for Lucky Strike cigarettes. An attractive woman is reclined beneath the caption "20,679 physicians say Luckies are less irritating." Cord front wheel drive automobile advertisement inside front cover. Average wear. Unmarked. 
Price: 199.95 USD
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2 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American December 1931 Volume 145 Number 6
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1931 First Edition Paperback Good 4to - over 9" - 12" tall 
Features: Chemistry may become the important post-depression factor; Editorials - extreme naval economy; farm by-products - one dollar for ducks - no dole for us - pilotless plane of the future; Cows fed irradiated yeast give ricket-preventive milk; Space as yet unfathomed - man's report is - "no bottom"; Better engines for navy planes; Speeding rail freight - new merchandise containers carry less than carload lots; Man-made oases in American deserts; Poland becomes a maritime nation - denied use of Danzig, Poland builds her own seaport; Has forest conservation created a false alarm?; Modern coal for modern markets - coal is now washed and thoroughly cleaned; Trademarks in disguise - the secret of a good trademark is its arbitrary nature; How stable is the earth's crust?; Masterpiece of Minoan Art; Babylonian brick reliefs; a link between Hellenistic and Roman painting; Butterfly faking - a new industry - rare and costly species "manufactured" from common varieties; Stone age man's world-wide culture. Back cover boasts colour Lucky Strike advertisement featuring illustration of a sultry Jean Harlow. She is quoted as saying "It's a delight to find a celophane wrapper that opens without an ice pick." Average wear. Unmarked. Two very small tears to fore-edge of back cover. 
Price: 199.95 USD
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3 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American June 1929 Volume 140 Number 6
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1929 First Edition Paperback Fair Magazine 4to - over 9" - 12" tall 
Features: A motoris may be asleep even if his eyes are open; Editorials: save Old Ironsides, Humanizing science, Television's future, Submarine safety; Skilled workmanship on organs for church, theater and home; Architects as room designers; The strangest thing in physics; Firsts in aviation; Towers of Hudson River bridge are rising rapidly; The highest known velocity; Prospecting with artificial earthquakes; the month in medical science - punch drunk, u.v. rays, compressed air pranks, posture, yellow fever, rider's legs, tar poison, childhood teeth, food colors; The search for the first American; Education adopts the motion picture; Pointers from a pen maker; Death Valley; Egyptian vandalism 3400 years ago; Aerodynamic wind mills; Television advances; Protecting paintings for posterity; Roman engineering triumphs; Light airplaine design contest; Wasteful cotton baling methods; Early Indians in Florida.Major damage to front cover along spine. Half of spine missing. Back cover features colour Camel cigarette advertisement with the caption "Now it's unanimous. I'd walk a mile for a Camel... So would I" Two-colour "Dodge Brothers Trucks" advertisement inside front cover. Inside back cover is a very attractive colour Packard automobile advertisement with a few small spots of soiling. Ad shows a strapping young man fabricating auto parts. Well-worn. 
Price: 199.95 USD
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4 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American June 1930 Volume 142 Number 6
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1930 First Edition Paperback Fair 4to - over 9" - 12" tall 
Features: Aluminum and its hard-boiled alloys; Super magnetic fields; Influence of the coconut on Philippine industrial life; Birds of a bleak arctic island; Fragmentary molecules of the sun; Beautiful bridges on new rail line - exceptional engineering problems on European railway; Sinanthropus - the Peking man; Coney Island's museum - the first institution designed to show play-reaction; Six great institutions now have naval R.O.T.C.; Linemen of the sea - with the men who splice broken transatlantic cables; Features of speed queen The Europa - faster than the Bremen; Is there an ether?; Better days for aviation; Tangled commerce abides where children smoke and swim - Manus are the pack peddlers of the pacific; Moving a substation underground; Power from the earth's hot interior?; Athens Broadway; an ancient bakery; Light furnishes Ballroom decorations. Camel cigarette ad on back cover features several suave temptors and a temptress. Top inch of spine missing. Cracks to spine. One inch tear to fore-edge of front cover. Significant overall wear. 
Price: 199.95 USD
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Scientific American Magazine, December (Dec.) 1929  - Giant Planes, Munn, Orson D.: Editor
5 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American Magazine, December (Dec.) 1929 - Giant Planes
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1929 First Edition Paperback Fair Magazine 4to - over 9" - 12" tall Brown, Howard V. 
Pages 465-560. Features: Scuttled German fleet is salvaged; When reindeer roamed the Pyrenees; Office building of the new era; Television's progress; Giant Airplanes; Behind the scenes in modern archeology; Timing the Schneider Cup races; The Puzzles of the comets - II; Radio in 1930; Largest electrified metal mine; Insuring safety on airlines; The art of Pliocene Man; Esthetic Engineering; American Passenger Air Transport III; Wires and Cables for the Hudson River Bridge; and more. Above-average wear. Front cover nearly loose. Multiple openings to backstrip. A worthy reference copy 
Price: 199.95 USD
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Scientific American November (Nov.) 1929 Volume 141 Number 5  - Featuring Timeless Great Depression Advertising Fail, Munn, Orson D.: Editor
6 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American November (Nov.) 1929 Volume 141 Number 5 - Featuring Timeless Great Depression Advertising Fail
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1929 First Edition Paperback Fair Magazine 4to - over 9" - 12" tall McCay, Winsor 
Lucky Strike cigarette ad on back cover provides a truly classic and timeless example of a mis-timed advertisement. Consider that the great Wall St. stock market crash of 1929 occurred mere days before this issue hit the newsstands. Beneath the caption "An Ancient Prejudice has been removed" appears a clenched fist labeled as "American Intelligence" breaking a heavy chain. Top left a paranoid miser stacks his gold by candlelight. Top right a wealthy couple visits their palatial bank. Text beneath miser reads "Hoarding gold with the fanatical zeal of the miser has vanished. American Intelligence sponsors thousands of banking institutions to which the individual (i.e. the wealthy couple) safely entrusts his wealth." The message is clear. Readers should put their trust (and money) in the banks, and shun gold. This issue was likely printed just as the Great Crash occurred, causing countless financial institutions to go under - and destroying even more individual fortunes. (The ad goes on to claim that cigarettes have similarly overcome the prejudice against them.) A truly stunning work which deserves to be preserved and reflected upon in this age of limitless fiat currency printing. Average wear with three-inch crease to lower corner of back cover. Suitably framed and mounted, this ad will make a superlative office display for any precious metals executive. 
Price: 4500.00 USD
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7 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American November 1931 Volume 145 Number 5
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1931 First Edition Paperback Good 4to - over 9" - 12" tall 
Features: Africa's first national park; Editorials - building for parity a false alarm - whose fault is it?; Power development on the Columbia River - the first power project on one of the most famous of North American streams; United States plant patent number 1 - only time will show the value of plant patents, the first of which has just been released; The hottest place in the universe - what keeps the stars shining?; Henry Ford, the Practical - the automobile manufacturer knows how to do things , and how to get them done; Are there creatures like ourselves in other worlds?; The birth, life, and death of a railroad ticket; Mercury vapor power to the fore - two new and larger units have been ordered; Australia's great meteorite; Paper's thinnest web - making tissue paper; Where not to look for oil and gas; Electrical aids to blind flying; Etruscan safety pin; Excavating Rome's seaport; A modernized university library - Sterling Memorial Library at Yale; Why question the reasoning of animals? - authentic stories seem to indicate their reasoning power. Page 293 is a full page tribute, with black and white photo, to thirty-year old Linus Pauling, hailed as "a rising star who may yet win the Nobel Prize." Light erasure mark at top corner of front cover. Average wear. Unmarked. 
Price: 199.95 USD
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8 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American October 1931 Volume 145 Number 4
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1931 First Edition Paperback Good 4to - over 9" - 12" tall 
Features: Behind the scenes of news gathering - a co-operative, non-profit organization aids in disseminating accurately the news of the world (the Associated Press); Editorials - cause or effect of war? - fundamentals of education - "Rolling down to Rio" by airplane - drug control; More hard luck for the ether - a funal blow is dealt to the ether theory by experiments performed with a highly refined interferometer; Tungsten bows to the plating bath - this important metal can now be deposited electrolytically; The sun an atom builder - a new theory - an attempt to explain where the sun gets the energy which it radiates; Wings over three Americas - safety and comfort for passengers are the aims of international airways; Science lends a hand to the Red Cross; New paints from synthetic resins; Are swimming pools a health menace?; Some important exhibitions in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts; A solar observatory for the amateur - how to build simple equipment for solare research work; Cotton stalks - a new source of rayon; Celluloid taxidermy; Taming Silicosis; Combating magnetism in watches - Elinvar makes possible non-magnetic watch parts; When a sunbeam splits - an elementary principle of physics and an unusual analogy; The private car, yacht of the rails - the utmost in luxury that can be built within the limitiations of a railroad car. Two creases to front cover. Average wear. Unmarked. 
Price: 199.95 USD
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9 Munn, Orson D.: Editor Scientific American September 1929 Volume 141 Number 3
New York Scientific American Publishing Company 1929 First Edition Paperback Fair Magazine 4to - over 9" - 12" tall 
Features: The new planetariums for Chicago and Philadelphia; Editorials - C.F. Brush, Sea safety code, Men's clothes, air country clubs; Licorice the versatile; Uncle Sam gives us new money - the process, in brief, of making paper currency; Why does an oil gusher gush?; Charting Canada's wilderness from the air - more accurate than with transit and chain; Our army's mechanized forces - development of the American fighting tank since war times (with interesting photos); What becomes of star light?; Is the diesel airplane practical?; Silvering the world's largest telescope; Foiling the burglar III - vault combinations and clocks; Sea Safety contest; the Zeppelin's American home - huge hangar being erected in Akron; Steam Come-back - outdistancing water for generation of electricity; Designing large telescopes; World's largest vineyard in California; Ancient history from aloft; Compressed air used in Novel hospital - diabetes, anemia, and other maladies treated in an unusual manner; the 'heat makes cold' regrigeration unit. Attractive colour Packard automobile advertisement inside back cover. Colour Lucky Strike advertisment upon back cover features a puckered damsel and the caption "To keep a slender figure no one can deny... Reach for a Lucky instead of a sweet." There are some rubbings/marks to this page. Page 198 is a full page advertisment for passenger aircraft manufactured by the Ford Motor Company in Dearborn Michigan. Damage to bottom of spine. Unmarked. 
Price: 199.95 USD
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